Biomechanics

Biomechanics is the study of the structure and function of biological systems such as humans, animals, plants, organs, cells, and molecules by means of the methods of mechanics. At The University of Texas at Austin, our researchers apply engineering principles to understand how living systems function at all scales of organization and to translate this understanding to the design of devices and procedures that will improve diagnostic and therapeutic methods in health care. Read more...

BME faculty and GSC members in Biomechanics

Biomedical Imaging and Instrumentation

New imaging technologies are providing the ability to interrogate and manipulate living biological specimens dynamically to yield information at the molecular, cellular, and tissue levels. We believe these techniques will dramatically advance minimally invasive optical technologies and the biological questions and medical problems they are being used to address. Our department focuses on interdisciplinary research for disease detection. The emphasis is to integrate new advances in imaging science, molecular markers of disease, and novel contrast agents for translational research. Read more...

BME faculty and GSC members in Biomedical Imaging and Instrumentation

Cellular and Biomolecular Engineering

Cellular and biomolecular engineering forms the underpinning of molecular medicine. Areas that fall within the context of cell and biomolecular includes tissue engineering, immune engineering, systems biology, genomics, the synthesis of biomaterials that modulate tissue responses, development of smart drug delivery matrices, the design of therapeutic macromolecules, gene therapy and many others. At UT, we have a core of faculty that has established an outstanding record of scientific accomplishment and technological innovation. Several successful companies have sprung out of research carried out at UT Austin by BME faculty, including Pharmacyclics, Therasense and Focal. Read more...

BME faculty and GSC members in Cellular and Biomolecular Engineering

Computational Biomedical Engineering

Due to dramatic, multidisciplinary advances in molecular biology and technology, the first complete human genome is available. Advances in genomic technologies have the potential to revolutionize the way health care is practiced; however , computational advances and a new kind of biological information science are required to achieve this potential.

Conducting research at this interface of computational biomedical engineering, prognostics and diagnostics that combine clinical data with patient specific genotyping and molecular profiling have the potential to produce significantly improved choice of therapies for individual patients. Read more...

BME faculty and GSC members in Computational Biomedical Engineering